Battery Buggy Team:
Nathan K
Owen P
Nathan L
Tim C (BA)
Jessie S.!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


How to solder:
http://www.aaroncake.net/electronics/solder.htm


Battery Buggy Brake Math...
Straight Line Distance =8m
How many turns per inch on your rod?
What is the diameter of your wheel?
What is the distance on the actual arc?

http://scioly.org/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?p=23179

http://soinc.org/battery_buggy_b

http://www.scioly.org/wiki/Battery_Buggy

http://www.scioly.org/wiki/Microswitches


Added: 11.03.10 Ideas from the Event Captain

Our experienced Battery Buggy B event captain is sorry that he will not be able to give a workshop this coming Saturday, so he has sent some ideas.
Here are a few ideas I had regarding building a battery buggy. You may have already thought of most of these:

Going:

  • Turn the driving wheels with a direct drive motor or use a gear box. If you drive each side of the buggy separately, you could negotiate the bucket by powering one wheel slightly faster than the other.
  • Speed is of the essence. Get there quickly.
  • Wheels made of CDs seem like a good idea but they will wobble unless you can design a strong hub.

Stopping:

  • A wing nut on the drive axle seems like one of the most common methods of stopping. This can be precisely calibrated with enough testing, especially since you know that the distance at the Regional Competition will be 8 m..
  • Time your motors to turn off or stop after a burst of speed. A simple circuit can do this.
  • After a certain time or distance, a braking mechanism could pop down via rubber bands and stop the buggy quickly. But remember, 2.i. only the wheels are allowed to touch the floor.

Turning:

  • Presumably the students would want to make an arc around the bucket. They could calibrate the angle of the front wheels to different arcs and nail the 8m dot.
  • The outer wheels driving slightly faster than the inner wheels will cause an arc.
  • A weight suspended above the vehicle by a bendable rod could be pulled to the side in order to transfer weight to that side. If the rear wheel(s) is like a trailing linkage, this should steer the buggy depending on how far the weight is leaning to the side.
  • A rudder, like on an airplane.
Disclaimer -none of these ideas have been tried and who knows if they will work!
from: http://www.sandiegoso.org/divb2011/div_b_buggy.html
i would have tried to make it turn at certain points.
http://fryescienceolympiad.pbworks.com/w/page/32564324/Battery-Buggy